Banding of haemorrhoids

The banding (or ligation) of haemorrhoids is a non-surgical procedure where a tight rubber band is attached around the base of an internal haemorrhoid. The band constricts the blood supply to the haemorrhoid, causing it to fall off.

Banding has proved to be a very effective long-term treatment for internal haemorrhoids. This quick and painless treatment has a much lower risk of side effects than surgery. If you have a number of haemorrhoids, the treatment may need to be repeated.

Banding is not suitable for the treatment of external haemorrhoids (those that are outside the anus).

Banding is a routine procedure that involves your consultant or nurse inserting a small instrument into your anus. This is used to place a tight elastic band around the internal section of your haemorrhoid, cutting off its blood supply. This causes the haemorrhoid to fall off, relieving your symptoms within 10 to 14 days. The banding procedure only takes a few minutes to perform and is not painful.

You may experience a dull ache for a few hours after the band has been put on; you can help relieve this using painkillers such as paracetamol. You may also feel as though you want to open your bowels. This is normal, but you should try to resist the urge to go until the following day if possible.

You’ll be able to bath or shower as normal, but you’ll need to avoid strenuous exercise for around 24 hours.

In a small number of cases, banding of haemorrhoids can cause bleeding, pain and ulcers (open sores). The procedure may not be suitable if you're taking anticoagulant medication for other conditions. We always discuss any risks with you before carrying out the procedure.

Consultant headshot

Mr Yasser Abdul Aal

Consultant General and Emergency Surgeon
Consultant headshot

Mr Ayman Hamade

Consultant Surgeon
Consultant headshot

Mr Deya Marzouk

General surgeon
Consultant headshot

Mr George Tsavellas

Consultant General Surgeon
Get in touch with Benenden Hospital

You can access treatment in a number of ways, as a self-paying or privately insured patient, a Benenden member, or as an NHS patient. In all cases, you just need to ask your GP to refer you to Benenden Hospital. For general enquiries, contact us below.

You can access treatment in a number of ways, as a self-paying or privately insured patient, a Benenden member, or as an NHS patient. In all cases, you just need to ask your GP to refer you to Benenden Hospital. For general enquiries, contact us below.