Morton's Neuroma

​Morton’s neuroma is a condition that affects one of the nerves that run between the bones of the foot. Surgery can be used to treat the condition when it has failed to respond to other, less-invasive treatment options.

Treating Morton’s neuroma usually initially involves self-help measures such as wearing properly fitting shoes, using orthotic devices, taking painkillers and losing weight. Sometimes steroid injections may be suggested. Usually surgery is only recommended when these treatments have been tried and have proved unsuccessful, and if you’re experiencing severe pain.

The operation may be carried out under a general anaesthetic (so you’ll be asleep) or a local anaesthetic (so you’ll stay awake but won’t feel anything). The operation usually takes less than an hour and you’ll usually go home on the same day.

During surgery a small cut is made between the affected toes either on the bottom or on the top of the foot. The surgeon will then either increase the space around the nerve by taking away surrounding tissue, or remove part of the nerve itself. If part of the nerve is removed then the affected area will become permanently numb.

Immediately after surgery we’ll help you manage any pain or discomfort with painkillers. We’ll discuss your aftercare and arrange any follow-up appointments with you before you leave hospital.

Initially, you'll need to wear a special shoe that protects the affected area until it is healed enough to wear normal shoes. You’ll probably be able to walk very soon after the operation, but it’ll take several weeks or months to fully recovery.

The outcome of surgery to treat Morton's neuroma is usually very positive, with most people reporting complete pain relief when fully recovered.

Serious complications rarely occur, but with any surgical procedure there can be some risks, including:

  • pain
  • infection
  • scarring
  • bleeding
  • blood clots (including deep vein thrombosis (DVT)

Specific risks of surgery in the region of the toe include:

  • nerve damage, numbness
  • Morton's neuroma may return

Self-help measures such as wearing properly fitting shoes, using orthotic devices, taking painkillers and losing weight. Steroid injection may be suggested, but this often leads to a recurrence of the condition.

Get in touch with Benenden Hospital

You can access treatment in a number of ways, as a self-paying or privately insured patient, a Benenden member, or as an NHS patient. In all cases, you just need to ask your GP to refer you to Benenden Hospital. For general enquiries, contact us below.

You can access treatment in a number of ways, as a self-paying or privately insured patient, a Benenden member, or as an NHS patient. In all cases, you just need to ask your GP to refer you to Benenden Hospital. For general enquiries, contact us below.