Gastroscopy

An OGD or gastroscopy is where a thin, flexible tube with a camera on the end is inserted via the mouth to investigate the oesophagus, stomach, and small intestine.

Image title

During an OGD or gastroscopy, your consultant or endoscopist will study the area and see if there are any problems, and will also take biopsies if necessary.

A gastroscopy/OGD is usually performed as a day case procedure, meaning that there is no need for an overnight stay in hospital.

Before your gastroscopy, you will be asked to lie down on your left side. A guard will then be placed in your mouth which will help to protect your teeth. A local anaesthetic may be sprayed on the back of your throat to help you tolerate swallowing the gastroscope.  The gastroscope is a thin, flexible tube with a camera and light on the end of it. It is passed through your mouth and slowly down towards your stomach. The gastroscope sends the images back to a monitor which your consultant can see and examine. Still images can also be taken for further examination. If necessary, biopsies (tissue samples) may be taken during the procedure too.

You will be instructed beforehand whether you need to stop taking certain medications.

You will be advised to stop eating and drinking typically 4-6 hours before your procedure, as your stomach needs to be completely empty in order to allow your doctor to see clearly into your stomach with no obstructions.

Some patients choose to have their gastroscopy done under sedation. If you do opt for sedation, you will need to ensure someone is able to drive you home and remain with you for 24 hours after the procedure, as you may experience further drowsiness.

You will be allowed to return home not long after the procedure is complete. If you have had your gastroscopy under sedation, you will need to wait until the effects of the sedation have worn off.

Most patients find they do not require any pain relief after the procedure, but this can be provided if required.

As with all procedures, there are some side effects and potential risks. Your doctor will discuss any risks with you beforehand. 

Get in touch with Benenden Hospital

You can access treatment in a number of ways, as a self-paying or privately insured patient, a Benenden member, or as an NHS patient. In all cases, you just need to ask your GP to refer you to Benenden Hospital. For general enquiries, contact us below.

You can access treatment in a number of ways, as a self-paying or privately insured patient, a Benenden member, or as an NHS patient. In all cases, you just need to ask your GP to refer you to Benenden Hospital. For general enquiries, contact us below.